Monday, December 17, 2012

Doherty welcomes Property Tax waiver for pyrite homes

Fine Gael Meath East TD, Regina Doherty, has today (Friday) welcomed confirmation that pyrite homes will be granted a waiver from the Local Property Tax. The issue is to be addressed in the context of the Finance Bill by the Minister for Finance, Michael Noonan TD.

“I am hugely relieved that a wavier will be granted to people living in homes affected by pyrite, ensuring they won’t have to pay a property tax on homes that are essentially worthless. I expressed concerns last week when the Finance Bill was published, as it did not contain any specific reference to pyrite properties. I suggested that waivers should be granted. The issue has been raised with the Minister for Finance, who has agreed with this approach.


“People living in homes affected by pyrite have been through an awful couple of years. They took out huge mortgages to buy properties either as family homes or sound investments. What they have been left with are properties that are in many cases uninhabitable. Being forced to pay the property tax would have been another blow for these families; thankfully common sense has prevailed.

“I would like to commend Minister Noonan and the Minister for the Environment, Phil Hogan TD, for their action on this matter.

“There is a long road ahead for pyrite householders. Progress needs to be made on a resolution process set out in the report from the Pyrite Panel, as published by Minister Hogan earlier this year. Action has not been as swift as I would like on the testing and categorisation of homes; a process which is essential before remediation works can be commenced.

“I welcome the commitment from Minister Hogan that he will do what is necessary to ensure responsible stakeholders provide effective solutions for affected homeowners. I will continue to raise this issue with Government to make sure the voices of pyrite householders continue to be represented.”

1 comment:

sonnymc said...

I agree that those living in Pyrite affected homes have (and are still having) difficult times, through no fault of their own. I also agree that for many of them, their properties have limited value. But why should other people, many in negative equity, on social welfare or in low paying jobs, on pensions etc have to pay for the upkeep of watermains, roads, lights etc in these developments. If a property is worth very little (and some are far more affected than others) then applying the property tax rate to that low (or no) value will result in low (or no) liabilities.